Bananas

 They have a crescent shape, smooth, yellow, soft, pliable skin and edible, seedless, creamy-white, sweet flesh.

 

There is 5 different varieties of Bananas, there are Cavendish or Williams, Lady Finger, Gold Finger, Red types or Red Daccas, Plantains.

 

Bananas are available all year round but there most but mostly in April, May and June.

 

Bananas are grown on big high trees. You know there ripe when they turn yellow.

 

They have a lot of vitamin C and are a good source in Fibre.

 

Bananas can be cooked in all different ways; they can make Banana chips, banana smoothie and Banana pops

 

Bananas can come in a verity of different colours, such as green, red, yellow, and orange.

Scars by J.M. Hatto

Everyone was assembled out the front. All the students of Mooroopna Secondary Collage; from the Year Sevens to the Year Twelves. It was an eerie sight, seeing everyone sitting quietly out the front. No screaming. No calling out to friends. No mucking around. Just a silence so thick I could’ve cut it with a knife.

I picked my way through the gathered crowd to my friends, who were also standing in a stunned silence.

“What’s wrong?” I asked, my voice breaking the silence. It sounded weird, echoing around the courtyard. Sue answered me like clockwork.

“All the teachers – all the adults – it’s like they’ve …”

“Disappeared,” One of the listening Year Twelves gasped, as if by saying it would make it not true. I sucked in a deep breath; that would explain a lot of things.

But it couldn’t be true. Things like that didn’t happen. Not here. Not in real life. Did they? “No,” I answered myself, not caring I had uttered it aloud.

“No – there’s got to be some mistake – they all have a – a … meeting, or something … there has to be. Real people don’t just – disappear.”

“But they did, Jen,” Catie whispered, “There is no other explanation for it.”

More kids arrived, and one by one they also found out the truth. Finally, when the whole school -excluding the teachers – were gathered around the tables, seated at the chairs, the school captains stood on the highest tables, yelling for our attention. We all fell silent, wanting something to do. But they didn’t even start before they were interrupted.

Men in black suits, guns hanging casually over their shoulders, marched into the car park, so suddenly no one, soldier nor student, made a sound. They were in formation, a dangerous square of soldiers. Why were there soldiers in our school car park? Why, when all other adults have gone? The men stopped abruptly, as if on command. The eerie silence was once more.

“Who are you?” I heard someone call out, their voice quivering with unease, “And why the hell are you here?”

They didn’t answer, but suddenly broke out of formation to run at us, guns at the ready, yelling to surrender.  Screams filled the air; from both student and soldier alike – we were fighting back. I myself was throwing punch after kick at a soldier whom had come at me; soon he was on the ground, and I moved to help one of my fellow Year Sevens fend off a rather burly one.

“Retreat! Now!” A soldier yelled, running from the car park sporting a bleeding lip and bruising brow. The others followed immediately, not wanting to be left alone with the enemy.

As they disappeared, our parents, grandparents, uncles and aunties all rushed around the opposite corner. There was a great cheer; they had been released, the sudden danger had gone. As I fought my way over to my family, the crowd engulfed me, in a sea of bodies.

Beep. Beep. Beep.

I opened my eyes. The familiar roof of my bedroom met my eyes, and I rubbed my eyes harder. What? Just mere seconds ago I had been at school. Then I realised; it had all been a dream. I sighed with relief, straightening up.

Ow!” I cried out, holding my arm. There, where in the dream that was only so vivid, was a scar I had thought I had gotten from that soldier. I gulped.

“Mum? Dad?”

No answer.

 

By J.M. Hatto

Boys don’t cry

Random HouseBy Malorie Blackman
Seventeen year old Dante has his life all planned out. He has studied hard and plans on going to uni and becoming a journalist. However, his world is blown apart when his ex girlfriend, Melanie turns up on his door step with a baby. His baby.
Boys Don’t Cry follows the story of Dante and how he copes looking after his baby daughter after Melanie goes shopping and doesn’t come back. This is not just a story about Dante but also his brother Adam who is comfortable with his own sexuality even thought others struggle with it. This is an emotionally charged story about love and families.
This is a great read.

Where she Went by Gayle Forman

Where she went by Gayle Forman on PhotoPeach

Where she went

By Gayle Forman

 

If you had a second chance at first love … would you take it?

Adam Wilde is a pop star at the peak of his career, but despite all the outward signs of success, Adam is on the edge of a breakdown.  He is taking anti-anxiety pills and he can barely talk to the rest of his band.  Three years ago, his girlfriend disappeared from his life with out any explanation.  Adam was hurt and confused and wrote the songs of the bands hit album based on his emotions. One night in New York Adam takes a solitary walk and he see the one person he thought he would never see again.

This is the follow up book of If I stay.  I enjoyed both of these books, I couldn’t wait to finish reading them especially Where she went.

Vinnie’s War by David McRobbie

Vinnie's WarVinnie’s War is set when a war rages across Europe. Vinnie is sent away from the bombs of London with countless other children in a hope of survival. The evacuee children go to the country town of Netterford, which seems nice until they meet the locals. Vinnie and his new friends find they now have their own war to fight. Will he find a place where he belongs? The novel gives you an idea of what many children experienced when sent away from their families during World War II. It is a novel of friends, hope, and survial.

8/10.

If I stay by Gayle Forman

Living’s all about making choices.  Dying’s no different…

Everything is good in Mia’s life.  She has great parents, an adorable little brother and Adam is her boyfriend.  She also has dreams of becoming a great cello player and is well on her way to achieving this. Suddenly everything changes, Mia and her family are involved in a car accident…her parents and brother are dead and Mia is fighting for her life.  Mia becomes an invisible observer, watching as her body lies in a coma. Alternating between past and the present Mia thinks about her life, about her family, friends and her boyfriend Adam.  She has to make the decision to fight for her life or to die.  Adams love for Mia helps her to make her decision.